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Steven Bennett

Steven Benett

Name: Steven Bennett
Position: Head Chef and Hotelier

After learning his trade growing up as a baker and butchers son in Louth, Steven spent the early years of his 20-year career working his way up through the ranks in various award-winning and Michelin starred restaurants.

After a recent 5-year stint as owner and Chef Patron at his multi award-winning 2 Rossette restaurant, The Comfy Duck, Steven now runs his consultancy and catering company, The Lincolnshire Chef, cooking at private dinner parties and events for up to 500 guests in locations in and around Lincolnshire, as well as heading up the kitchen at Healing Manor Hotel.

Steven spends his time out of the professional kitchen helping to put Lincolnshire on the foodie map, appearing at food festivals and events all around the UK, demonstrating with ingredients grown and produced in Lincolnshire.

Recently awarded his second Rosette, winning Business Person of the Year at the Northern Lincolnshire Business Awards, and granted Guild of Master Craftsman, Steven’s style of food embraces traditional French cooking, combined with modern dining and his ethos of locally sourced, seasonal ingredients.

Q1. Starter or dessert?

A1. Starter – definitely a savoury man.

Q2. What’s your favourite dish to cook?

A1. Anything with Game. Autumn and winter has to be one of the best times of year for any British chef to be cooking with local produce. Here in Lincolnshire we have endless supplies of game from local shoots to cook with. Not only is it fresh, it’s an incredible ingredient to cook with as game holds so many unusual and earthy flavours.

Q3. Can’t fail comfort food?

A1. A bowl of cereal if I’m feeling particularly tired after a long shift in the kitchen. This is a truly guilty pleasure and not one that I shout about as a classically trained chef… Turkey drummers (yes from the freezer), mashed potatoes, tender stem broccoli, gravy and mint sauce. Growing up it was a poor-mans Sunday roast. Even my partners family now present me with a cloche of turkey drummers on Christmas day as an ongoing family joke.

Q4. When did you realise you wanted to be a chef?

A4. Growing up I was always surrounded by food and cooking. I grew up with butchers and bakers in my family and would always be up early in the morning helping to get the breads ready for the day. Becoming a chef was very much a natural path to go down.

Q5. What formal qualifications do you have and where did you get them?

A5. My history of education isn’t the strongest, I have 6 GCSE’s and other qualifications that I’ve received throughout my career as necessities. I went to sixth form to do A-levels but got thrown out, and didn’t complete my hospitality course at Grimsby College. Whilst I struggled with education I’ve  always had a strong work ethic, which has got me to where I am today.

Q6. What was your first job in catering?

A6. As many chefs did, I started out as a pot wash, as it was a way to get myself straight into the professional kitchen.

Q7Favourite kitchen equipment or gadget?

A7. Dehydrator. We use this in the kitchen to convert what would be many waste products into garnishes and flavours for other dishes. We save all of the peelings from mushrooms, dehydrate and then blend down into a fine powder. It holds an almost cocoa-like flavour and we use this on our steaks and meats instead of pepper to season.

Q8. What do you think is the most interesting food trend at the moment?

A8. Whilst as a chef I’m very much about ingredients being left alone and not over complicated, the new trend for fusion and Asian flavours is quite interesting. Ingredients such as wasabi and matcha are regularly appearing in both sweet and savoury dishes, and it’s interesting as a chef to be able to experiment and develop dishes with new flavours.

Q9. Favourite cook books and/or food writer?

A9. Marco Pierre White – this was my first book

Gordon Ramsey – Chef for all seasons,

Q10. All-time most memorable meal? 

A10.  My partner surprised me for my 40th last year with a flight over to Spain just to visit 3 Michelin star restaurant, Quique Dacosta. It was such an incredible tasting experience with 26 courses in a rather remote location.

Q11. If you could eat at any restaurant in the world where would it be?

A11. Top three on the hit list are all America-bound; Alinea, 11 Maddison Park and Grace.

Q12. What one piece of advice would you give a student/trainee chef?

A12. Be prepared to work hard. As with any job, make sure it’s something that you love doing, but be prepared to not always love it. Being a chef isn’t just a job, it’s a lifestyle.

Biography

Name: Steven Bennett
Position: Head Chef and Hotelier

After learning his trade growing up as a baker and butchers son in Louth, Steven spent the early years of his 20-year career working his way up through the ranks in various award-winning and Michelin starred restaurants.

After a recent 5-year stint as owner and Chef Patron at his multi award-winning 2 Rossette restaurant, The Comfy Duck, Steven now runs his consultancy and catering company, The Lincolnshire Chef, cooking at private dinner parties and events for up to 500 guests in locations in and around Lincolnshire, as well as heading up the kitchen at Healing Manor Hotel.

Steven spends his time out of the professional kitchen helping to put Lincolnshire on the foodie map, appearing at food festivals and events all around the UK, demonstrating with ingredients grown and produced in Lincolnshire.

Recently awarded his second Rosette, winning Business Person of the Year at the Northern Lincolnshire Business Awards, and granted Guild of Master Craftsman, Steven’s style of food embraces traditional French cooking, combined with modern dining and his ethos of locally sourced, seasonal ingredients.

Questions & Answers

Q1. Starter or dessert?

A1. Starter – definitely a savoury man.

Q2. What’s your favourite dish to cook?

A1. Anything with Game. Autumn and winter has to be one of the best times of year for any British chef to be cooking with local produce. Here in Lincolnshire we have endless supplies of game from local shoots to cook with. Not only is it fresh, it’s an incredible ingredient to cook with as game holds so many unusual and earthy flavours.

Q3. Can’t fail comfort food?

A1. A bowl of cereal if I’m feeling particularly tired after a long shift in the kitchen. This is a truly guilty pleasure and not one that I shout about as a classically trained chef… Turkey drummers (yes from the freezer), mashed potatoes, tender stem broccoli, gravy and mint sauce. Growing up it was a poor-mans Sunday roast. Even my partners family now present me with a cloche of turkey drummers on Christmas day as an ongoing family joke.

Q4. When did you realise you wanted to be a chef?

A4. Growing up I was always surrounded by food and cooking. I grew up with butchers and bakers in my family and would always be up early in the morning helping to get the breads ready for the day. Becoming a chef was very much a natural path to go down.

Q5. What formal qualifications do you have and where did you get them?

A5. My history of education isn’t the strongest, I have 6 GCSE’s and other qualifications that I’ve received throughout my career as necessities. I went to sixth form to do A-levels but got thrown out, and didn’t complete my hospitality course at Grimsby College. Whilst I struggled with education I’ve  always had a strong work ethic, which has got me to where I am today.

Q6. What was your first job in catering?

A6. As many chefs did, I started out as a pot wash, as it was a way to get myself straight into the professional kitchen.

Q7Favourite kitchen equipment or gadget?

A7. Dehydrator. We use this in the kitchen to convert what would be many waste products into garnishes and flavours for other dishes. We save all of the peelings from mushrooms, dehydrate and then blend down into a fine powder. It holds an almost cocoa-like flavour and we use this on our steaks and meats instead of pepper to season.

Q8. What do you think is the most interesting food trend at the moment?

A8. Whilst as a chef I’m very much about ingredients being left alone and not over complicated, the new trend for fusion and Asian flavours is quite interesting. Ingredients such as wasabi and matcha are regularly appearing in both sweet and savoury dishes, and it’s interesting as a chef to be able to experiment and develop dishes with new flavours.

Q9. Favourite cook books and/or food writer?

A9. Marco Pierre White – this was my first book

Gordon Ramsey – Chef for all seasons,

Q10. All-time most memorable meal? 

A10.  My partner surprised me for my 40th last year with a flight over to Spain just to visit 3 Michelin star restaurant, Quique Dacosta. It was such an incredible tasting experience with 26 courses in a rather remote location.

Q11. If you could eat at any restaurant in the world where would it be?

A11. Top three on the hit list are all America-bound; Alinea, 11 Maddison Park and Grace.

Q12. What one piece of advice would you give a student/trainee chef?

A12. Be prepared to work hard. As with any job, make sure it’s something that you love doing, but be prepared to not always love it. Being a chef isn’t just a job, it’s a lifestyle.

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